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Friday, September 26, 2008

No name storm



A storm system has come ashore in South Carolina. Currently heading to the west but expected to move north throughout the day. This storm has no name.

Winds have been recorded as high as 60 mph yesterday. There is an obvious center of circulation and the origin was tropical. yet for some reason the weather services are not considering this a tropical storm. In all of the discussions regarding Tropical Storm Kyle, I thought they were talking about no-name here. Instead they really meant the storm that is heading north from The Dominican Republic and is expected to soak the northeast this weekend and early next week. That will certainly be a major weather issue but we should not ignore the situation at hand in the southeast either.

This system is probably officially a depression. I guess the big question is whether it is tropical in nature or not. I do not know what would make a system as well defined as this not be tropical exspecially with origins in the Caribbean.

The key thing is that the North Caroline, South Carolina and Georgia costs have soem very high waves and the potential for strong rip currents. Rainfall in South Carolina may be heavy in spots although I do not think it will be such that there will be flooding concerns.

Unfortunately, once again a system is close enough to bring hope to us in the dry north Georgia hills but the forecast is for some light showers at best. Lake Lanier is close to 18 feet below normal. We could use a good drenching from asystem like this.



From the National Hurricane Center:

1. THE WELL-DEFINED NON-TROPICAL LOW PRESSURE SYSTEM IS NOW OCATED OVER CENTRAL SOUTH CAROLINA AND CONTINUES TO MOVE FARTHER INLAND. STRONG WINDS...COASTAL FLOODING...HIGH SURF...AND DANGEROUS RIP CURRENTS WILL GRADUALLY SUBSIDE ALONG THE COASTS OF NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA TODAY...BUT COULD CONTINUE ALONG PORTIONS OF THE U.S.MID-ATLANTIC COAST DURING THE NEXT DAY OR TWO.

INTERESTS ALONG THE U.S. EAST COAST FROM THE MID-ATLANTIC REGION NORTHWARD TO NEW ENGLAND SHOULD MONITOR STATEMENTS FROM THEIR LOCAL NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE FORECAST OFFICES...AND ALSO HIGH SEAS FORECASTS ISSUED BYTHE OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND WARNINGS.

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